The New Pledge

I do believe that a Pledge of Allegiance is an appropriate and positive exercise. However, when it is nothing more than reciting meaningless drivel about a piece of cloth, it is no pledge at all.

Proposal — The New Pledge

“I pledge allegiance to the Republic
of the United States of America,
and to the Constitution on which it stands.
One nation, indivisible,
With liberty and justice for all.”

Now THAT is a patriotic, accurate, and Constitutional pledge. We should pledge to that which really matters.

We should ritualize our loyalty in an accurate and constructive manner – to remember from where our country’s true strength lies.

We should not fetishize a piece of cloth.

Without the Constitution, that piece of cloth is worthless.

Update: I deleted “indivisible.” I see no sense in such a word being in the pledge. The nation should be divisible, if that comports with the self-determination desires of the people in any particular portion of the nation.

10 Responses to The New Pledge

  1. […] of Allegiance and removing “In God We Trust” from U.S. Currency. (For the record, I support the first, but not the second). “Godless Americans and Kay Hagan. She hid from cameras. Took […]

    • tinnyray says:

      The Pledge of Allegiance was the origin of the Nazi salute, and the swastika -although an ancient symbol- was used to represent crossed S-shapes for “socialism” under the National Socialist German Workers Party.

      Francis Bellamy (cousin of author Edward Bellamy) was a socialist in the Nationalism movement and authored the Pledge of Allegiance (1892), the origin of the stiff-armed salute adopted much later by the National Socialist German Workers Party. See the work of the symbologist Dr. Rex Curry.

  2. […] bad I’m not a superstition-monger from a vassal state. Then my New Pledge idea might gain some […]

  3. jfischer1975 says:

    you missed something…

    “…under his noodly appendage…”

  4. Joe Max says:

    I love the idea, but can critique your composition. It seems a bit wordy, it doesn’t flow poetically (like the traditional one does – or did, before they stuck that awful “under dog” line) and putting the “enemies” line makes it seem a bit militant for a free citizen. IMHO, of course.

    How about:

    “I pledge allegiance to the Republic
    of the United States of America,
    and to the Constitution on which it stands.
    One nation, indivisible,
    With liberty and justice for all.”

    Short, sweet and to the point. Easy for a kindergarten kid to memorize. Retains more of the original, with a similar cadence. And I think this fulfills your specifications: accurate, patriotic, based *on* the Constitution, takes the useless piece of cloth out.

  5. blueollie says:

    Great idea, but whoever tried this would be committing political suicide (“so and so is anti-god and anti-Flag”).

    But yeah, I like the two suggested pledges.

  6. […] Satyricon: it is easy to see why this blog offends others (but I love it). Yes, at times, he attacks people that I approve of, even when he mostly agrees […]

  7. Todd says:

    Nice pledge, but the image of children chanting in unison still creeps me out. Too much Leni Riefenstahl.

  8. journalist says:

    How about if children in government schools (socialist schools) robotically chant the following in unison each day for 12 years of their lives (and also as adults whenever led by government officials):

    “I pledge not to repeat things that other people say, especially not by robotically chanting such things in unison each day for 12 years of my life.”

    The irony will be exquisite.

    The above was adapted from the comedian Steve Martin who would invite his audiences to join him as he made his “non conformist’s pledge” (the audience follow along and then laugh and awkwardly trail off for the last line):

    “I promise to be different.
    I promise to be unique.
    I promise not to repeat things that other people say.”

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