Shameless Plug – Professional Attire

By J. DeVoy

A short while ago, a fellow member of the bar asked me if something he was planning to wear looked “like shit.”  I don’t know. Probably.  It’s not an uncommon problem for professionals like accountants, journalists, lawyers, engineers, and others in research positions who subordinate style to substance. Rather than ask someone who is similarly lacking in vision, why not direct the question to someone who knows what they’re doing?

I did this with Tanner Guzy a few weeks ago and it was the right decision.  Tanner runs the blog Masculine Style and offers very reasonably priced consulting services.  Tanner was able to immediately hone on in what I was trying to clean up about my appearance and offer clear, detailed, and succinct advice about how to improve it.  For $25 and five minutes of time spent filling out a short submission form, I had a detailed analysis within 24 hours that included the following excerpts:

For suits, you’ll want to avoid dark, deep colors like black, charcoal, and midnight navy as you don’t have a strong enough contrast and they will wash you out.  Notice in your second picture that the focus is more on your hair than your face and that your lips look a bit pasty. That’s because the colors are too dark for your complexion.

and

Because of your height you will have the freedom to either opt in or out of having cuffs sewn into your dress pants. This visually anchors your legs and will make them appear just a bit shorter but also larger and more substantial. You can also roll your jeans if you’d like to.

Your dress pants should have a slight break or not break at all. This will visually lengthen your legs and help you appear taller. Too much break will make you appear shorter, ruin the slimness of tailored trousers, and make it look like your suit doesn’t fit.

Does this kind of stuff come naturally to some people? I don’t know, maybe.  But $25 is a pretty good deal for nearly instantaneous advice about how to dress better.  As Brian Tannebaum has previously pointed out, the best attorneys are not the flashiest dressers, but a slight tune-up can improve the visual effect of even the most casual clothes.

Tanner offers a number of other services, such as finding items for specific events (e.g. weddings, funerals – others’ or your own – and the like), or generally finding items to add to your wardrobe.  The cost? 10% of your pre-tax budget.  Considering that some personal shoppers and “””style consultants””” charge hourly, this is a pretty good deal.  Plus, Tanner has a written record of actually understanding what he’s talking about, down to the nuances of  jacket arm hole positioning.  Unlike a personal shopper, there’s no upselling with Tanner, and you’re in charge of using as much or as little of his services as needed.

I had such a good experience with Tanner that I wanted to write this to promote his service, available here.  The value he unlocked for $25 was substantial.

12 Responses to Shameless Plug – Professional Attire

  1. MarkL says:

    The armhole discussion is incredibly interesting – it explains what I got after meeting with a tailor at the Indochino event in NYC. I’d previously bought a suit from them and didn’t like how the shoulders looked when I raised my arms – he made adjustments in their system and the next suit came with high armholes. It is (almost imperceptibly) more difficult to put on, but looks much better.

    Thanks for the info and the link to Tanner. I may have tocheck out his services.

    • J DeVoy says:

      And thank you for the information about Indochino. I’ve been looking into them and thinking about buying a jacket there to see what it’s all about; it’s interesting to hear that their product development is an ongoing and interactive process.

      The delivery window is a little long, but it’s still a great value proposition on paper.

      • Leo says:

        Indochino is shit. Don’t waste your money.

      • MarkL says:

        I’ve been thoroughly satisfied with them. I did a poor job of measuring my first suit and it would have cost more to tailor it than their $75 credit (and, got it at a ridiculous discount to begin with because of a promotion they advertised on twitter). They instead asked me to have the tailor provide updated measurements and *made me a completely new suit*.

        I went to their “traveling tailor” event in NYC to order my second suit. I wore my existing one and actually spoke with one of the people who runs their facility in China. He asked about the concerns I had and then made several adjustments so that things would be perfect next time. As expected, they were. The second suit fit perfectly, right out of the box.

        I ordered some new shirts the other day and am looking forward to their arrival.

        As a fat guy, finding suit options that actually look really good is worth the additional delivery time.

        Do be aware that right now is New Year’s in China and most businesses are closed or operating on reduced staff as everyone travels to see family and friends.

  2. Seconded on Tanner’s services. He’s a cool guy, easy to work with and I like his fashion advice. Highly recommended.

  3. CPlatt says:

    I spent a day with William Kuntsler once (bailing out one of his clients–one of the most memorable days of my life). He was a down-and-dirty fighter in many ways, but for court, he dressed immaculately in a beige suit. I was impressed.

  4. Your link to ‘http://www.masculine-style.com/’ is broken.

    • MKC says:

      Also, you have quotation mark spam in the second to last paragraph (feel encouraged to delete this post whenever convenient).

      • J DeVoy says:

        That was stylistic/intentional. But thank you for obsessively policing the grammar of a free blog with content you receive at absolutely no charge. What’s your website, again?

  5. Leo M. Mulvihill, Jr. says:

    A few other things
    1) no man should own or wear a black suit except for funerals.
    2) cuffs are awesome irrespective of your height
    3) 2-2.5″ cuffs are even better
    4) read Alan Flusser if you want to learn a bit more about complexions and colors. Flusser’s own style has been batshit for the last few years but his books remain great.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,530 other followers

%d bloggers like this: